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Shared Solutions®
DOWNLOAD PRESCRIPTION & SERVICE REQUEST FORM (PSR)

For patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (RMS)

PAST. PRESENT. FUTURE.

An immunomodulator with demonstrated efficacy, safety, and tolerability.1

Going Down

3-TIMES-A-WEEK COPAXONE® 40 mg/mL
THE #1 PRESCRIBED RMS THERAPY IN THE US2†

to get your patient started today

AN RMS TREATMENT CHOICE FOR TODAY
AND TOMORROW

You're focused on their future, and so are we. See our ongoing commitment to relapsing MS patients, backed by patient support and the milestones in the development of COPAXONE®.

A personalized approach
to help patients start and stay
committed to copaxone®  therapy

Teva’s Shared Solutions® program has supported the relapsing MS community for 2 decades and counting.
Trust Teva's Shared Solutions® to partner with you, your patients, and your practice.

A HISTORY MARKED BY INNOVATION

From discovery and development to robust clinical trials, COPAXONE® has a history steeped in scientific
exploration and dedication to relapsing MS care.

Indication

COPAXONE® (glatiramer acetate injection) is indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis.

 

Important Safety Information

COPAXONE® is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to glatiramer acetate or mannitol.

Approximately 16% of patients exposed to COPAXONE® 20 mg per mL compared to 4% of those on placebo, and approximately 2% of patients exposed to COPAXONE® 40 mg per mL compared to none on placebo experienced a constellation of symptoms immediately after injection that included at least 2 of the following: flushing, chest pain, palpitations, anxiety, dyspnea, throat constriction, and urticaria. In general, these symptoms have their onset several months after the initiation of treatment, although they may occur earlier, and a given patient may experience 1 or several episodes of these symptoms. Typically, the symptoms were transient and self-limited and did not require treatment; however, there have been reports of patients with similar symptoms who received emergency medical care.

Transient chest pain was noted in 13% of COPAXONE® 20 mg per mL patients compared to 6% of placebo patients, and approximately 2% of COPAXONE® 40 mg per mL patients compared to 1% on placebo. While some episodes of chest pain occurred in the context of the immediate postinjection reaction described above, many did not. The temporal relationship of this chest pain to an injection was not always known. The pain was usually transient, often unassociated with other symptoms, and appeared to have no clinical sequelae. Some patients experienced more than 1 such episode, and episodes usually began at least 1 month after the initiation of treatment.

At injection sites, localized lipoatrophy and, rarely, injection site skin necrosis may occur. Lipoatrophy may occur at various times after treatment onset (sometimes after several months) and is thought to be permanent. There is no known therapy for lipoatrophy.

Because COPAXONE® can modify immune response, it may interfere with immune functions. For example, treatment with COPAXONE® may interfere with recognition of foreign antigens in a way that would undermine the body's tumor surveillance and its defenses against infection. There is no evidence that COPAXONE® does this, but there has not been a systematic evaluation of this risk.

In controlled studies of COPAXONE® 20 mg per mL, the most common adverse reactions with COPAXONE® vs placebo were injection site reactions (ISRs), such as erythema (43% vs 10%); vasodilatation (20% vs 5%); rash (19% vs 11%); dyspnea (14% vs 4%); and chest pain (13% vs 6%).

In a controlled study of COPAXONE® 40 mg per mL, the most common adverse reactions with COPAXONE® vs placebo were ISRs, such as erythema (22% vs 2%).

ISRs were one of the most common adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of COPAXONE®. ISRs, such as erythema, pain, pruritus, mass, edema, hypersensitivity, fibrosis, and atrophy, occurred at a higher rate with COPAXONE® than placebo.

Please see full Prescribing Information for COPAXONE®.

References

  1. COPAXONE® (glatiramer acetate injection) prescribing information. Rev. 8/2016. Teva Neuroscience, Inc.
  2. IMS Health National Prescription Audit, March 2017. Data proprietary to IMS Health.

Based on prescriptions for the market definition of disease-modifying therapies for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis in the US (IMS Health National Prescription Audit, March 2017). All Rights Reserved by IMS.


Injections for 3-times-a-week COPAXONE® 40 mg must be at least 48 hours apart.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

COPAXONE® is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to glatiramer acetate or mannitol.
Approximately 16% of patients exposed to COPAXONE® 20 mg per mL compared to 4% of those on placebo, and approximately 2% of

Indication

COPAXONE® (glatiramer acetate injection) is indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis.

 

Important Safety Information

COPAXONE® is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to glatiramer acetate or mannitol.

Approximately 16% of patients exposed to COPAXONE® 20 mg per mL compared to 4% of those on placebo, and approximately 2% of patients exposed to COPAXONE® 40 mg per mL compared to none on placebo experienced a constellation of symptoms immediately after injection that included at least 2 of the following: flushing, chest pain, palpitations, anxiety, dyspnea, throat constriction, and urticaria. In general, these symptoms have their onset several months after the initiation of treatment, although they may occur earlier, and a given patient may experience 1 or several episodes of these symptoms. Typically, the symptoms were transient and self-limited and did not require treatment; however, there have been reports of patients with similar symptoms who received emergency medical care.

Transient chest pain was noted in 13% of COPAXONE® 20 mg per mL patients compared to 6% of placebo patients, and approximately 2% of COPAXONE® 40 mg per mL patients compared to 1% on placebo. While some episodes of chest pain occurred in the context of the immediate postinjection reaction described above, many did not. The temporal relationship of this chest pain to an injection was not always known. The pain was usually transient, often unassociated with other symptoms, and appeared to have no clinical sequelae. Some patients experienced more than 1 such episode, and episodes usually began at least 1 month after the initiation of treatment.

At injection sites, localized lipoatrophy and, rarely, injection site skin necrosis may occur. Lipoatrophy may occur at various times after treatment onset (sometimes after several months) and is thought to be permanent. There is no known therapy for lipoatrophy.

Because COPAXONE® can modify immune response, it may interfere with immune functions. For example, treatment with COPAXONE® may interfere with recognition of foreign antigens in a way that would undermine the body's tumor surveillance and its defenses against infection. There is no evidence that COPAXONE® does this, but there has not been a systematic evaluation of this risk.

In controlled studies of COPAXONE® 20 mg per mL, the most common adverse reactions with COPAXONE® vs placebo were injection site reactions (ISRs), such as erythema (43% vs 10%); vasodilatation (20% vs 5%); rash (19% vs 11%); dyspnea (14% vs 4%); and chest pain (13% vs 6%).

In a controlled study of COPAXONE® 40 mg per mL, the most common adverse reactions with COPAXONE® vs placebo were ISRs, such as erythema (22% vs 2%).

ISRs were one of the most common adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of COPAXONE®. ISRs, such as erythema, pain, pruritus, mass, edema, hypersensitivity, fibrosis, and atrophy, occurred at a higher rate with COPAXONE® than placebo.

Please see full Prescribing Information for COPAXONE®.